Calyptix Releases Free Email Phishing Resource for IT Providers Calyptix Releases Free Email Phishing Resource for IT Providers

Calyptix Releases Free Email Phishing Resource for IT Providers

by Calyptix, July 13, 2016

Network security company addresses the surging hacker trend that’s targeting small businesses.

Phishing 2016 Report - coverCharlotte, NC – Calyptix Security Corp., a leading provider of network security services for small and medium businesses, today released a report that deconstructs email phishing – a widespread network security threat that is behind many of the biggest data breaches in recent memory.

The resource, Email Phishing for IT Providers, defines the threat, shows examples of attacks, and explains how IT providers can protect their businesses and clients. A free download of the report is available on the Calyptix website.

“Phishing emails are one of the most popular ways to launch a cyber-attack. Our aim in this report is to give IT providers a firm understanding of this threat and how it’s evolving, and also give them tools to educate their clients on how to stop these attacks from hurting their businesses,” said Ben Yarbrough, CEO, Calyptix Security.

Email phishing is the act of sending fraudulent emails with the goal of stealing information from the target. By designing emails to appear to come from a trusted source, the attackers hope to trick victims into sharing sensitive information or installing malware.

Email phishing is decades old, yet it remains one of the most successful ways to launch a cyber-attack. Many major data breaches begin with simple phishing emails.

For example, the infamous 2013 data breach at Target began when attackers successfully phished an HVAC company that subcontracted with the mega-retailer. This led to the breach of Target’s network and the theft of 110 million customer records.

The Sony data breach of 2014 also began with phishing emails. Company executives gave up their Apple ID credentials, resulting in the crippling of the company’s network and mass destruction of its data. The company also endured the humiliation of public blackmailing.

Investigators suspect the 2015 data breach at Anthem, the second-largest health insurance provider in the U.S., began with phishing emails. The messages tricked several employees into visiting spoofed webpages and entering their login credentials. The breach affected records of about 80 million people, or the rough equivalent of 25% of the U.S. population.

A popular subset of email phishing is called “spear phishing.” This approach narrowly targets users to improve the chances of a successful attack. Of all spear phishing attacks launched in 2015, an enormous 43% targeted small businesses (those with fewer than 250 employees), according to the Symantec 2016 Internet Security Threat Report (ISTR).

While a successful attack may not completely ruin a company, taking the right precautions and acting quickly when breached can greatly reduce the risk of major data loss.

The free report from Calyptix highlights new email phishing trends, how to avoid attacks, steps MSPs and VARs can take to combat phishing, and how to educate clients on the dangers of phishing.

 

Download a free copy of Email Phishing for IT Providers

 Email Phishing for IT Providers

 

About Calyptix Security

Calyptix Security is dedicated to helping small and medium-size businesses secure their networks so they can raise profits, protect investments, and control technology. The company’s UTM device for network security and management, AccessEnforcer, makes it easy to protect SMB networks so companies can forget about network security and focus on winning. Developed, built, and serviced in the U.S., AccessEnforcer is a flexible UTM solution that allows MSPs and VARs to provide security that fits their needs and business models.

 

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